Tyre Brady 2019 NFL Draft Profile

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Tyre Brady
MIAMI, FL - NOVEMBER 24: Tyre Brady #8 of the Marshall Thundering Herd catches a touchdown in the first half against the FIU Golden Panthers at Ricardo Silva Stadium on November 24, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)

Overview
Position
: Wide receiver
Height: 6’3″
Weight: 211 pounds
School: Marshall Thundering Herd

Combine Performance Data
Bench press
: 12 reps
Vertical jump: 32.0 inches
Broad jump: 9 feet, 9 inches
20-yard shuttle: 4.25 seconds

Tyre Brady 2019 NFL Draft Profile

A native of Homestead, FL, Tyre Brady closed out his high school career in style. In the 2013 state title game, he made six catches totaling 69 yards and scored a touchdown to help South Dade knock off Apopka. Rated a three-star prospect by most recruiting services, Brady had offers from seven schools including all three of the Power Five programs in the state of Florida. And it was the one closest to home that proved the most appealing as he ended up committing to Miami.

Brady’s biggest claim to fame while with the Canes was playing a part in the wild eight-lateral play at the end of the game that enabled them to escape with a last-second win over Duke in 2015. But for the most part, he contributed rather meagerly. He played in just two games as a true freshman and managed just 122 receiving yards and one touchdown grab the following season. The combination of lack of production and a midseason coaching change prompted Brady to opt for a change of scenery.

And so he headed up north to Marshall anxious to prove his worth as an impact receiver. After sitting out a year, Brady burst onto the scene in 2017. He finished the season with 942 yards and eight touchdowns with his 15.19 yards per reception the best in Conference USA among players who hauled in at least 50 catches. He went a step further during his senior season as one of five receivers in the conference to eclipse 1,000 yards receiving while adding nine touchdowns. He received first-team all-conference recognition for his efforts.

Strengths

  • a well-built player who looks the part of a next level pass-catcher;
  • does a good job tracking to the inside as a means to beat press coverage;
  • can line up in plus splits or in the slot;
  • has the physical traits to project above average catch radius;
  • capable of hauling in imperfect throws;
  • displays focus and courage in being able to win balls in traffic;
  • a fierce competitor who relishes physicality;
  • two years of impressive production at Marshall.

Weaknesses

  • route-running is basic and too predictable;
  • needs to develop more sharpness in route transitions;
  • too often gets crowded at the top of his routes;
  • defaults to cradling the ball into his body rather than using his hands;
  • struggles to separate downfield;
  • might have issues releasing against competent press corners;
  • doesn’t show much in terms of blocking ability.

NFL Comparison: Chris Conley

Teams With Need at Position: Baltimore Ravens, Buffalo Bills, Green Bay Packers, Indianapolis Colts, New England Patriots, Philadelphia Eagles, Pittsburgh Steelers, San Francisco 49ers, Washington Redskins

Projection: Fifth to sixth round

Bottom Line

Brady emerged as one of the top receivers within Conference USA after transferring to Marshall. He’s a feisty prospect who loves mixing it up physically and is capable of hauling in contested catches. His 33 5/8″ arms should enable him to consistently come up with the odd inaccurate throw. And he’s fairly versatile, having lined up all over the field for the Thundering Herd.

Perhaps the biggest concern surrounding Brady’s ability to make an impact at the next level is his route-running. He didn’t run a particularly broad route tree in college and will need to expand to his repertoire so as not to be rendered ineffective as a pass-catcher. His overall explosiveness doesn’t particularly jump out on tape as well. And he’s not a particularly competent blocker which may hinder his every-down value.

Brady becoming an impact receiver in the NFL is contingent on him refining the way he runs routes. If he can do that, he’ll certainly become a reliable third or possibly second option on a roster at the next level. That and his ability to consistently make circus catches should enable him to hold up in the pros. Look for him to be off the board around the middle of day three.

Embed from Getty Images

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