Devin Singletary 2019 NFL Draft Profile

Devin Singletary
BOCA RATON, FL - SEPTEMBER 15: Devin Singletary #5 of the Florida Atlantic Owls celebrates after scoring his fifth touchdown against the Bethune Cookman Wildcats during the first half at FAU Stadium on September 15, 2018 in Boca Raton, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)

Overview
Position: Running Back
Height: 5’9″
Weight: 200 pounds
School: Florida Atlantic Owls

Devin Singletary 2019 NFL Draft Profile

Just a glimpse at Devin Singletary‘s career arc would lead you to believe he is a prospect destined to excel in the NFL, having enjoyed tremendous success at every level.

A two-time first team all-state selection at American Heritage in Delray Beach, FL, Singletary won the Fred Taylor Offensive Player of the Year award in high school, and would likely have been a higher-profile prospect had he not shunned traditional in-state powerhouses Florida State and Miami in favor of Florida Atlantic, for whom he was considered a steal.

Singletary’s decision was emphatically vindicated. He earned two first team All-Conference USA selections and was Conference USA MVP and a Doak Walker Award semi-finalist in 2017, a year in which he led the nation in rushing touchdowns with 32. He was second in that category behind Travis Etienne in 2018 with 22 and the combination of that production and an already very refined skill set should lead him to be high on the boards of teams looking for a boost in the backfield.

Strengths

  • Low to the ground with a well-built frame;
  • Demonstrates excellent vision to spot holes and cutback lanes;
  • Slender enough to slip through small creases – shows impressive burst when hitting the hole;
  • A very elusive runner – displays magnificent flexibility in his lower body to make cuts in tight spaces and make defenders miss in the backfield;
  • Combines vision and agility very well. Does an excellent job of reading defenders at the second level and in open field and changing direction to get by them;
  • Boasts superb contact balance bounce off tackles and stay on his feet for extra yardage;
  • Showed improvement as a finisher in 2018, dropping his shoulder into contact more frequently;
  • Does a nice job in pass protection, looks for work and excels at chopping defenders down with cut block;
  • Outstanding production with 4,287 rushing yards and 66 touchdowns.

Weaknesses

  • Lacks elite long speed to take big runs the distance;
  • More of a slippery runner than a power back – Never going to run people over;
  • Momentum can be stopped relatively easily when tackled with proper technique;
  • Will occasionally try to do much instead of taking what’s there or settling for minimal losses;
  • Pass protection technique still needs some refinement, often just tries to get in the way;
  • Limited experience as a receiver out of the backfield – only 51 receptions in three seasons;
  • Comes into the draft on the back of a heavy workload, having carried the ball 714 times in collegiate career.

NFL Comparison: Frank Gore

Teams With Need at Position: Buffalo Bills, New York Jets, Kansas City Chiefs, Oakland Raiders, Philadelphia Eagles

Projection: Second round

Bottom Line

There may be better all-around athletes in this class of running backs, but you’ll struggle to find a prospect at the position as polished as Singletary, who heads into the draft with a strong chance of making the considerable leap from Conference USA to the NFL because of his superb combination of vision and lower body flexibility. It allows him to spot cutback holes extremely quickly and make cuts that would be beyond other backs. With his elusiveness and contact balance that enables him to consistently bounce off tackles, Singletary should be able to excel as a two-down back. It’ll allow coaches to afford to have confidence in his ability to protect the quarterback on passing downs.

Having said all that, there may be some concern over his ability to perform as a receiver out of the backfield having been offered limited opportunities in that role in college. His heavy collegiate workload may also be a worry to some as well. However, in an NFL where more teams use committee backfields, there is little to stop Singletary being able to make an immediate impact in a two-man rushing attack.

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